Estimating Values Of Milk Components To A Dairy Manufacturer

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1978-09-01
Authors
Ladd, George
Dunn, John
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Two methods of assigning values to milk components are presented. One method is developed for determining values per point of protein and fat in a cheddar cheese plant. In this method, the value per point of solids is computed from the effect of variation in solids test on the firm s profits. It can be extended to apply to solids not fat instead of protein, and to other manufactured products. The procedure is presented in worksheet form and applied to a cheese plant. In the plant studied, the maximum premium per point of protein per 100 kg of milk is $0.2881 (= $.13 per point per 100 pounds of milk).

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