Improving Soil and Water Quality with Riparian Buffers

Thumbnail Image
Date
1997-11-18
Authors
Schulz, Richard
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Person
Isenhart, Thomas
Professor
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Series
Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The Iowa State University Integrated Crop Management Conference is Iowa's premier crop production education event. No other program in Iowa brings together the diverse range of topics, slate of expert presenters and results of the latest University research.

The ICM Conference offers workshops focusing on the latest in crop production technology. Experts from Iowa and surrounding states will provide research updates and results in soil fertility, soil and water management, crop production and pest management.

Department
Abstract

The agricultural landscape has four major sources of non-point source (NPS) pollutants. These are: 1) surface and subsurface runoff which carry sediment and agricultural chemicals to streams; 2) eroding streambanks which can contribute more than fifty percent of the sediment load to the stream; 3) field tile drains which contribute the highest concentrations of soluble agricultural chemicals to streams; and 4) livestock grazing of streamside or riparian areas which contribute to bank instability and add animal waste and pathogens to the water. Maintaining or establishing a forested or prairie buffer along streams and rivers provides more than just a beautiful landscape. While a considerable body of evidence confirms that existing vegetated streamside zones can be effective sinks for NPS pollution (Castelle et a!. 1994, Osborne and Kovacic 1993, Lowrance 1992, Cooper eta!. 1987, Jacobs and Gilliam 1985, Lowrance eta!. 1985, 1984, Peterjohn and Correll 1984), little information is available for restored or constructed streamside buffer systems. Designing and establishing the right combination of native trees, shrubs and grasses as buffer strips and integrating them with constructed wetlands, soil bioengineering and rotational grazing can improve water quality.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Subject Categories
Copyright