Monstrous Stewardship and the Plantation in Charles Chesnutt's “The Goophered Grapevine”

Thumbnail Image
File
2022-GS Alert manu-SivilsMW-Monstrous Stewardship and the Plantation.pdf (131.11 KB)

File Embargoed Until: (2024-07-21)
Date
2022-07-21
Authors
Sivils, Matthew
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Routledge
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
English
Abstract
This chapter analyzes Charles W. Chesnutt’s 1887 short story “The Goophered Grapevine” in light of both cultural monster theory and environmental literary criticism. Specifically, it looks at how Chesnutt imagines the plantation as both the product and embodiment of a monstrous system of agriculturally-based racial oppression. Chesnutt’s story counters the romantic portrayals of the southern plantation so common to stories of the late nineteenth-century period. In so doing, he points out that the plantation system lives on in the post-bellum era, highlighting the idea that the combined racial and environmental abuse of the plantation derives from a cruel and short-sighted agricultural stewardship, one from which both southern and northern interests have much to gain.
Comments
This accepted book chapter is published as Sivils, M.W. Monstrous Stewardship and the Plantation in Charles Chesnutt's “The Goophered Grapevine”. in Stewardship and the Future of the Planet.
Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Copyright
Collections