Adaptations of Avian Flu Virus Are a Cause for Concern

Date
2012-02-01
Authors
Burns, Kenneth
Casadevall, Arturo
Roth, James
Cohen, Murray
Ehrlich, Susan
Enquist, Lynn
Fitch, J. Patrick
Franz, David
Fraser-Liggett, Claire
Grant, Christine
Imperiale, Michael
Kanabrock, Joseph
Keim, Paul
Lemon, Stanley
Levy, Stuart
Lumpkin, John
Miller, Jeffery
Murch, Randall
Nance, Mark
Osterholm, Michael
Relman, David
Roth, James
Vidaver, Anne
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Roth, James
Person
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Series
Department
Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine
Abstract

We are in the midst of a revolutionary period in the life sciences. Technological capabilities have dramatically expanded, we have a much improved understanding of the complex biology of selected microorganisms, and we have a much improved ability to manipulate microbial genomes. With this has come unprecedented potential for better control of infectious diseases and significant societal benefit. However, there is also a growing risk that the same science will be deliberately misused and that the consequences could be catastrophic. Efforts to describe or define life-sciences research of particular concern have focused on the possibility that knowledge or products derived from such research, or new technologies, could be directly misapplied with a sufficiently broad scope to affect national or global security. Research that might greatly enhance the harm caused by microbial pathogens has been of special concern (13). Until now, these efforts have suffered from a lack of specificity and a paucity of concrete examples of “dual use research of concern” (3). Dual use is defined as research that could be used for good or bad purposes. We are now confronted by a potent, real-world example.

Comments

This article is from Science 335 (2012): 660, doi:10.1126/science.1217994.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Collections