Understanding Poor Seismic Performance of Concrete Walls and Design Implications

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2014-02-01
Authors
Beyer, Katrin
Henry, Richard
Chai, Y. H.
Kowalsky, Mervyn
Bull, Desmond
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Sritharan, Sri
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Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering seeks to apply knowledge of the laws, forces, and materials of nature to the construction, planning, design, and maintenance of public and private facilities. The Civil Engineering option focuses on transportation systems, bridges, roads, water systems and dams, pollution control, etc. The Construction Engineering option focuses on construction project engineering, design, management, etc.

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The Department of Civil Engineering was founded in 1889. In 1987 it changed its name to the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering. In 2003 it changed its name to the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering.

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1889-present

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  • Department of Civil Engineering (1889-1987)
  • Department of Civil and Construction Engineering (1987-2003)
  • Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering (2003–present)

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Abstract

The 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquakes in New Zealand revealed (1) improved structural response resulting from historical design advancements, (2) poor structural performance due to previously identified shortcomings that had been insufficiently addressed in design practice, and (3) new deficiencies that were not previously recognized because of premature failure resulting from other design flaws. This paper summarizes damage to concrete walls observed in the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake, proposes links between the observed response and specific design concerns, and offers suggestions for improving seismic design of walls in the following areas: amount of longitudinal reinforcement in wall end regions, suitable wall thickness to minimize the potential for out-of-plane buckling, and minimum vertical reinforcement requirements.

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This is a manuscript of an article published as Sritharan, Sri, Katrin Beyer, Richard S. Henry, Y. H. Chai, Mervyn Kowalsky, and Desmond Bull. "Understanding poor seismic performance of concrete walls and design implications." Earthquake Spectra 30, no. 1 (2014): 307-334. doi: 10.1193/021713EQS036M. Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2014
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