Witchcraft Mythologies and Persecutions (review)

Thumbnail Image
Date
2010-07-01
Authors
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Bailey, Michael
Professor and Interim Department Chair
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
History
The Department of History seeks to provide students with a knowledge of historical themes and events, an understanding of past cultures and social organizations, and also knowledge of how the past pertains to the present.

History
The Department of History was formed in 1969 from the division of the Department of History, Government, and Philosophy.

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

This volume is the third in a series deriving from a conference held in Budapest in 1999. While the first volume focused on communication with spirits and spirit possession, and the second examined the place of demons and spirits in learned demonology and common belief (see reviews in Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft 1.2 [2006]: 257–60; 3.1 [2008]: 99–101), this volume deals directly with the topic of witchcraft, which the editors identify as "the most central theme of our conference" (p. 1). As in the previous volumes, most of the articles collected here focus on the early modern period, with [End Page 132] brief forays back into the Middle Ages (and in one case into deep antiquity), along with some more extended considerations of the continuation of witchcraft beliefs into modern times. The authors approach their topics from the disciplines of history, anthropology, and ethnography. Again as with the previous volumes, some articles are inevitably stronger than others. Some are quite short and tentative in their conclusions, seeming not to have been expanded much, if at all, from the conference papers that were their origin. A number of articles are very worthwhile, however, and as a whole this volume shares the strength with its earlier companions of including a large number of articles that focus on eastern European lands, which are typically relegated to the periphery of European witchcraft studies.

Comments

This is a book review from Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft 5 (2010): 132, doi:10.1353/mrw.0.0164. Posted with permission.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Copyright
Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2010
Collections