Roadmap for Enhanced Languages and Methods to Aid Verification

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2006-07-01
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Leavens, Gary
Abrial, Jean-Raymond
Batory, Don
Butler, Michael
Coglio, Alessandro
Fisler, Kathi
Hehner, Eric
Jones, Cliff
Miller, Dale
Peyton-Jones, Simon
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Computer Science

Computer Science—the theory, representation, processing, communication and use of information—is fundamentally transforming every aspect of human endeavor. The Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University advances computational and information sciences through; 1. educational and research programs within and beyond the university; 2. active engagement to help define national and international research, and 3. educational agendas, and sustained commitment to graduating leaders for academia, industry and government.

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The Computer Science Department was officially established in 1969, with Robert Stewart serving as the founding Department Chair. Faculty were composed of joint appointments with Mathematics, Statistics, and Electrical Engineering. In 1969, the building which now houses the Computer Science department, then simply called the Computer Science building, was completed. Later it was named Atanasoff Hall. Throughout the 1980s to present, the department expanded and developed its teaching and research agendas to cover many areas of computing.

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1969-present

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This roadmap describes ways that researchers in four areas -- specification languages, program generation, correctness by construction, and programming languages -- might help further the goal of verified software. It also describes what advances the ``verified software'' grand challenge might anticipate or demand from work in these areas. That is, the roadmap is intended to help foster collaboration between the grand challenge and these research areas. A common goal for research in these areas is to establish language designs and tool architectures that would allow multiple annotations and tools to be used on a single program. In the long term, researchers could try to unify these annotations and integrate such tools.

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Copyright 2006 by the authors.

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