Plasmodium falciparum protein export and erythrocyte remodeling in blood-stage malaria infections

Thumbnail Image
Date
2021-01-01
Authors
Peltier, Tanner
Major Professor
Joshua Beck
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Biomedical Sciences

The Department of Biomedical Sciences aims to provide knowledge of anatomy and physiology in order to understand the mechanisms and treatment of animal diseases. Additionally, it seeks to teach the understanding of drug-action for rational drug-therapy, as well as toxicology, pharmacodynamics, and clinical drug administration.

History
The Department of Biomedical Sciences was formed in 1999 as a merger of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology.

Dates of Existence
1999–present

Related Units

  • College of Veterinary Medicine (parent college)
  • Department of Veterinary Anatomy (predecessor, 1997)
  • Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (predecessor, 1997)

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

Malaria is a vector-borne disease caused by several unicellular Plasmodium species. Plasmodium are parasitic eukaryotic protozoans within the apicomplexan phylum named for an apical complex of secretory organelles and cytoskeletal components critical for host cell invasion. Infections are deadliest in children under five years of age and pregnant women. Here, we focus on the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and the molecular remodeling capabilities implemented against human erythrocytes. These changes can complicate Malaria infections and reach the microvasculature of the brain leading to death in the human host. Millions of Malaria infections occur each year and researching Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte remodeling may uncover new mitigation efforts. This paper will review research topics covering P. falciparum and the mechanisms used to adapt the erythrocyte to its own needs.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Subject Categories
Copyright
Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2021