Penetrating Sealer Effects on Durability Performance of Concrete Joints

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2022-11
Authors
Adil, Goran
Sadat, Seyedhamed
Ling, Yifeng
Kevern, John T.
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American Concrete Institute
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Taylor, Peter
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Wang, Kejin
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Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering seeks to apply knowledge of the laws, forces, and materials of nature to the construction, planning, design, and maintenance of public and private facilities. The Civil Engineering option focuses on transportation systems, bridges, roads, water systems and dams, pollution control, etc. The Construction Engineering option focuses on construction project engineering, design, management, etc.

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The Department of Civil Engineering was founded in 1889. In 1987 it changed its name to the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering. In 2003 it changed its name to the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering.

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1889-present

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  • Department of Civil Engineering (1889-1987)
  • Department of Civil and Construction Engineering (1987-2003)
  • Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering (2003–present)

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Abstract
Penetrating sealers are one means to reduce moisture and chemical transport into concrete. However, a large variety of products are available, possessing different functional modes of action. This study investigated representative families of penetrating sealers applied to vertical, sawn faces of properly air-entrained concrete (approximately 6%) to represent field application of sealers to concrete joints. Concrete was characterized for water transport, chloride diffusion, gas permeability, frost resistance in the presence of deicing salts, and potential for oxy chloride formation. The results showed that some sealers effectively reduced water absorption, prolonged time to saturation, and reduced chloride penetration. However, delayed time to critical saturation did not always result in improved frost resistance. All sealers significantly reduced the potential of oxychloride formation. The tests used for this study are broadly applicable and provide enhanced characterization for selection and application of new types of sealers and modes of action.
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This article is published as Adil, Goran, Seyedhamed Sadati, Peter Taylor, Yifeng Ling, Kejin Wang, and John T. Kevern. "Penetrating Sealer Effects on Durability Performance of Concrete Joints." ACI Materials Journal 119, no. 6 (2022). DOI: 10.14359/51737184. Copyright 2022 American Concrete Institute. Posted with permission.
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