Exudate Content of Exotic and Native plant species under Nitrogen Soil Stress

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2015-12-01
Authors
Ross, Britteny
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Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry seeks to provide students with a foundation in the fundamentals and application of chemical theories and processes of the lab. Thus prepared they me pursue careers as teachers, industry supervisors, or research chemists in a variety of domains (governmental, academic, etc).

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The Department of Chemistry was founded in 1880.

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1880-present

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Honors Projects and Posters
University Honors Program

The Honors project is potentially the most valuable component of an Honors education. Typically Honors students choose to do their projects in their area of study, but some will pick a topic of interest unrelated to their major.

The Honors Program requires that the project be presented at a poster presentation event. Poster presentations are held each semester. Most students present during their senior year, but may do so earlier if their honors project has been completed.

This site presents project descriptions and selected posters for Honors projects completed since the Fall 2015 semester.

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Abstract

Exudates are organic compounds released by plant roots to assist the root in navigating through soil, eliminating competition among rival plant species, and supporting mychorrhiza, if present. Mycorrihizial fungi that form symbiotic relationships with plant roots. The plant provides carbon-based compounds and amino acids to the mychorrhiza and in exchange the fungi provides more nitrogen and phosphorus for the plant. Ratibita pinnata, a native plant, form relationships with mycorrhizal fungi, while Leucanthemum vulgare, an exotic species, is likely to not form these relationships. Studies suggest that there may be a relationship between the amount of exudates released and what particular amino acids exuded based on the presence of mychorrhiza. In this study we tested this hypothesis, while also analyzing how the concentration of exudates is impacted by high and low nitrogen fertilizer application using a modified exudate collection method for pine trees (Pinus species) and using mass spectrometry to analyze exudate content. While we failed to collected detectable amounts of exudate material, the chamber design did allow for root growth and modifications were made for field deployment

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