Prediction of Black Globe Humidity Index in Poultry Buildings

Thumbnail Image
Date
2001-05-01
Authors
Yanagi, Tadayuki
Damasceno, G.
Teixeira, V.
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Xin, Hongwei
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

Dates of Existence
1905–present

Historical Names

  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Abstract

A computer model was developed to predict the black globe humidity index (BGHI) to simulate different resultant conditions in designing poultry buildings. The simulated BGHI values were compared to experimental measurements, obtained in a poultry facility at Viçosa, MG, Brazil, giving a mean deviation of 1.31 %. The model was then used to predict BGHI values as affected by roof slopes of 25º, 30º, and 35º, and column heights of 3.0 and 3.5 m. The results showed that BGHI can be reduced by 0.12 units per 5º increase in roof slope, or 0.10 units per 0.5 m increase in column height. The maximum reduction of BGHI, 0.33 units, was obtained when comparing the extreme conditions of 25º roof slope and 3.0 m height vs. 35º slope and 3.5 m height.

Comments

This proceeding is from Pp. 482-489 in Livestock Environment VI: Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium (21-23 May 2001, Louisville, Kentucky, USA) ed. Richard R. Stowell, Ray Bucklin, and Robert W. Bottcher. Paper No. 701P0201.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Copyright
Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2001