Dress, Gender, and Identity: An Inclusion of Many

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2018-01-01
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Adomaitis, Alyssa
Espinosa, Eleazer
Saiki, Diana
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International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The first national meeting of textile and clothing professors took place in Madison, Wisconsin in June 1959. With a mission to advance excellence in education, scholarship and innovation, and their global applications, the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) is a professional and educational association of scholars, educators, and students in the textile, apparel, and merchandising disciplines in higher education.

This site provides free, public access to the ITAA annual conference proceedings beginning in 2015. Previous proceedings can be found by following the "Additional ITAA Proceedings" link on the left sidebar of this page.

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In recent times, there has been a paradigm shift with regards to gender prompting cultural changes not only in conversation, but in many facets of society. The purpose of this concept paper is to investigate different gender identities as defined in current literature and to propose research and teaching strategies for dress scholars that incorporate these definitions. One database provides a list of gender identities and definitions is provided by the NYC Commission on Human Rights. Characteristics of these genders will be detailed in this presentation. Through theme analysis of these definitions the constructs used to define gender include physical traits, dress/appearances that are male and/or female, neither male nor female traits, gender less, incorporation of a combination of genders, sexual orientation, and sexuality on a continuity. Dress scholars can be part of this movement to redefine gender beyond the traditional male/female dichotomy in both teaching and research.

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