The influence of negative affectivity on depressive symptoms, perceived social support and marital satisfaction among African American women

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2009-01-01
Authors
Rink, Ashley
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Daniel Russell
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

Related Units

  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Abstract

This study examined whether the relationship between depressive symptoms and relational outcomes such as marital satisfaction and perceived spousal social support reflect the influence of a third variable, negative affectivity. Specifically, the study addressed whether the effects of negative affectivity on these other self report measures extend over time. Negative affectivity, marital satisfaction, and perceived spousal social support were tested as predictors of depression. The sample included 178 married African American women participating in the FACHS study. Both perceived spousal support and marital satisfaction continued to significantly predict depression after controlling for negative affectivity at a previous time point. These findings suggest that the effects of negative affectivity appear to weaken over time.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009