Data evidencing slow anaerobic digestion in emergency treatment and disposal of infectious animal carcasses

Date
2019-02-01
Authors
Glanville, Thomas
Koziel, Jacek
Ahn, Heekwon
Glanville, Thomas
Frana, Timothy
Koziel, Jacek
van Leeuwen, J. (Hans)
Nguyen, Lam
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Food Science and Human NutritionCivil, Construction and Environmental EngineeringVeterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal MedicineAgricultural and Biosystems EngineeringToxicology
Abstract

Burial of infectious and potentially infectious livestock and poultry animals is the most common response to an emergency situation. The data set summarizes 22-week-long experiment that simulates the environment found within conventional burial trenches for emergency disposal of animal carcasses, worldwide, sometimes with a topical application of quicklime as it is required in the Republic of Korea. This data set shows the rarely presented evidence of the extremely slow decay of animal carcasses. Besides visual evidence of no visible breakdown of carcass material, i.e., carcass (or carcass quarters and coarse cuts) still resembled the initial material at the end of the study, we present data characterizing the process. Specifically, temporal variations of digestate quality (pH, ammonia, volatile fatty acids), biogas production, and the persistence of odorous volatile organic compounds are summarized. The data provide important evidence of undesirable, slow progression of the digestion process. The evidence of failure to achieve practical endpoints with the anaerobic digestion provides the impetus for seeking alternative, improved methods of disposal that will be feasible in emergency context, such as aerated burial concept (Koziel et al., 2018 [1]).

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This article is published as Koziel, Jacek A., Heekwon Ahn, Thomas D. Glanville, Timothy S. Frana, J. Hans van Leeuwen, and Lam T. Nguyen. "Data evidencing slow anaerobic digestion in emergency treatment and disposal of infectious animal carcasses." Data in Brief 22 (2018): 227-233. DOI: 10.1016/j.dib.2018.12.001. Posted with permission.

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