Molecular Mechanism of the Glycosylation Step Catalyzed by Golgi α-Mannosidase II: A QM/MM Metadynamics Investigation

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2010-05-26
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Petersen, Luis
Ardèvol, Albert
Rovira, Carme
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Chemical and Biological Engineering

The function of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been to prepare students for the study and application of chemistry in industry. This focus has included preparation for employment in various industries as well as the development, design, and operation of equipment and processes within industry.Through the CBE Department, Iowa State University is nationally recognized for its initiatives in bioinformatics, biomaterials, bioproducts, metabolic/tissue engineering, multiphase computational fluid dynamics, advanced polymeric materials and nanostructured materials.

History
The Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1913 under the Department of Physics and Illuminating Engineering. From 1915 to 1931 it was jointly administered by the Divisions of Industrial Science and Engineering, and from 1931 onward it has been under the Division/College of Engineering. In 1928 it merged with Mining Engineering, and from 1973–1979 it merged with Nuclear Engineering. It became Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2005.

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1913 - present

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  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1913–1928)
  • Department of Chemical and Mining Engineering (1928–1957)
  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1957–1973, 1979–2005)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (2005–present)

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Abstract

Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 38, cleaves two mannosyl residues from GlcNAcMan5GlcNAc2 as part of the N-linked glycosylation pathway. To elucidate the molecular and electronic details of the reaction mechanism, in particular the conformation of the substrate at the transition state, we performed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations of the glycosylation reaction catalyzed by GMII. The calculated free energy of activation for mannosyl glycosylation (23 kcal/mol) agrees very well with experiments, as does the conformation of the glycon mannosyl ring in the product of the glycosylation reaction (the covalent intermediate). In addition, we provide insight into the electronic aspects of the molecular mechanism that were not previously available. We show that the substrate adopts an OS2/B2,5 conformation in the GMII Michaelis complex and that the nucleophilic attack occurs before complete departure of the leaving group, consistent with a DNAN reaction mechanism. The transition state has a clear oxacarbenium ion (OCI) character, with the glycosylation reaction following an OS2/B2,5B2,5 [TS] → 1S5 itinerary, agreeing with an earlier proposal based on comparing α- and β-mannanases. The simulations also demonstrate that an active-site Zn ion helps to lengthen the O2′−HO2′ bond when the substrate acquires OCI character, relieving the electron deficiency of the OCI-like species. Our results can be used to explain the potency of recently formulated GMII anticancer inhibitors, and they are potentially relevant in deriving new inhibitors.

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Posted with permission from Journal of the American Chemical Society, 132, no. 24 (2010): 8291–8300, doi:10.1021/ja909249u. Copyright 2010 American Chemical Society.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2010
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