Endosomal receptor trafficking: Retromer and beyond

dc.contributor.author Wang, Jing
dc.contributor.author Fedoseienko, Alina
dc.contributor.author Chen, Baoyu
dc.contributor.author Burstein, Ezra
dc.contributor.author Jia, Da
dc.contributor.author Billadeau, Daniel D.
dc.contributor.author Chen, Baoyu
dc.contributor.department Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology
dc.date.accessioned 2022-03-31T13:46:51Z
dc.date.available 2022-03-31T13:46:51Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08
dc.description.abstract The tubular endolysosomal network is a quality control system that ensures the proper delivery of internalized receptors to specific subcellular destinations in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although retromer was originally described in yeast as a regulator of endosome-to-Golgi receptor recycling, mammalian retromer has emerged as a central player in endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of a variety of receptors. Over the past decade, information regarding the mechanism by which retromer facilitates receptor trafficking has emerged, as has the identification of numerous retromer-associated molecules including the WASH complex, sorting nexins and TBC1d5. Moreover, the recent demonstration that several sorting nexins can directly interact with retromer cargo to facilitate endosome-to-Golgi retrieval has provided new insight into how these receptors are trafficked in cells. The mechanism by which sorting nexin 17 cargoes are recycled out of the endosomal system was demonstrated to involve a retromer-like complex termed the retriever, which is recruited to WASH positive endosomes through an interaction with the COMMD/CCDC22/CCDC93 (CCC) complex. Lastly, the mechanisms by which bacterial and viral pathogens highjack this complex sorting machinery in order to escape the endolysosomal system or remain hidden within the cells are beginning to emerge. In this review, we will highlight recent studies that have begun to unravel the intricacies by which the retromer and associated molecules contribute to receptor trafficking and how deregulation at this sorting domain can contribute to disease or facilitate pathogen infection.
dc.description.comments This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Wang, Jing, Alina Fedoseienko, Baoyu Chen, Ezra Burstein, Da Jia, and Daniel D. Billadeau. "Endosomal receptor trafficking: Retromer and beyond." Traffic 19, no. 8 (2018): 578-590, which has been published in final form at doi:10.1111/tra.12574. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/nrQBkkAz
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S
dc.source.uri https://doi.org/10.1111/tra.12574 *
dc.subject.keywords Retromer
dc.subject.keywords WASH
dc.subject.keywords Retriever
dc.subject.keywords Endosome
dc.subject.keywords Receptor Trafficking
dc.subject.keywords Sorting Nexin
dc.title Endosomal receptor trafficking: Retromer and beyond
dc.type Article
dspace.entity.type Publication
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relation.isAuthorOfPublication 70d2f327-fbfd-45eb-9296-9d8c7d067331
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication faf0a6cb-16ca-421c-8f48-9fbbd7bc3747
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