Germination and storage of apple seeds

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Date
2017-04-28
Authors
Bakke, A.
Richey, H.
Reeves, Kenneth
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Extension and Experiment Station Publications
It can be very challenging to locate information about individual ISU Extension publications via the library website. Quick Search will list the name of the series, but it will not list individual publications within each series. The Parks Library Reference Collection has a List of Current Series, Serial Publications (Series Publications of Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service), published as of March 2004. It lists each publication from 1888-2004 (by title and publication number - and in some cases it will show an author name).
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Abstract

Apple seeds will not germinate immediately after the fruit has become mature enough for picking. It is necessary for the seed to pass thru a stage of after-ripening.

The freshly extracted apple seed contains about 85 percent moisture. At room temperature approximately one-half of the moisture is lost during the first five days.

Soaking the seed prior to planting does not increase germination.

Ninety-one percent of apple seeds prevented from drying out when they were extracted from the fruit germinated. The best temperature for storage was found to be a temperature between 10 and 30 C. Seeds which had air dried germinated poorly in all cases.

Apple seeds which had been air dried and kept for a year did not germinate.

Apple seeds may be planted any time after Nov. 1. Where seeds are to be shipped long distances, special precaution must be made to keep the seeds from deteriorating.

The seed coat is not a factor in causing delayed germination.

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