Effects of Dual Targeted Therapies of Anticancer Drugs in Preclinical Models of Colorectal Cancer

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2017-12-06
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Brown, Monica
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Genetics, Development and Cell Biology

The Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology seeks to teach subcellular and cellular processes, genome dynamics, cell structure and function, and molecular mechanisms of development, in so doing offering a Major in Biology and a Major in Genetics.

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The Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology was founded in 2005.

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Honors Projects and Posters
University Honors Program

The Honors project is potentially the most valuable component of an Honors education. Typically Honors students choose to do their projects in their area of study, but some will pick a topic of interest unrelated to their major.

The Honors Program requires that the project be presented at a poster presentation event. Poster presentations are held each semester. Most students present during their senior year, but may do so earlier if their honors project has been completed.

This site presents project descriptions and selected posters for Honors projects completed since the Fall 2015 semester.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer kills over 50,000 people per year in the United States. While individual drugs can be somewhat effective, the median survival remains only 25-28 months. New therapies are needed, and dual targeted inhibitors are a promising area. A total of 7 cell lines, 4 of which are presented, were treated in varying concentrations of TAK228, an mTORC1/2 inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor Proliferation, apoptosis, and viability assays as well as immunoblotting were performed to determine the mechanism and efficacy. Immunoblotting determined that the target of TAK228 is mTORC1/2 and that Survivin may be a mechanism for the anti-proliferative effects. The study indicates that TAK228 and trametinib are viable combination partners for the possible future treatment of PI3K mutated cancers, especially within the RAS-mutant area.

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