Infrared Thermography Evaluation of Commercially Available Infrared Heat Lamps

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2006-07-01
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Davis, Jeremiah
MacDonald, Ron
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Xin, Hongwei
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

The objectives of this study were i) to comparatively characterize the radial temperature distribution of six commercially available heat lamps (100W to 250W) at different heights (45-66 cm or 18-26 in) when used with a commercially available plastic lamp fixture and ii) to evaluate the operation of a commercially available power controller used with the 175SYL heat lamp at a 51-cm (20-in) height for three power settings of 100, 125 and 175W.

Heat lamps with the same power output do not necessarily produce the same temperature profiles along the heated surface. Lamp lens prescriptions greatly affect the shape of the profile. By using a power controller with a given bulb, varying temperature ranges can be achieved while reducing overall energy as compared to varying height with same bulb.

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This is an ASABE Meeting Presentation, Paper No. 064152.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2006