Iowa Curriculum Strengthens Core Competencies of Parenting Educators.

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2004-01-01
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Greder, Kimberly
Morrill Professor
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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In response to the growing demand for parenting educators, and the need to ensure that educators have basic knowledge and skills rele­ vant to designing, implementing, and evaluating parenting education, Partnering with Parents, an outreach academy was developed. Analysis of data gathered via a follow-up survey, online discussion board, and focus group interviews revealed that participants increased their knowledge and developed skills after participating in the academy. Ninety-five percent of the participants reported being competent or very competent in facilitating parenting education after the academy as compared to 32% before the academy.

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This article is from Journal of Family and Consumer Science, 96(4): 14-21, Posted with permission.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2004
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