Asian Pacific American Showcase: Narratives of home and family push back against stereotypes of perpetual foreigners

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2020-05-01
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Dahlen, Sarah
Rodriguez, Noreen
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School of Education

The School of Education seeks to prepare students as educators to lead classrooms, schools, colleges, and professional development.

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The School of Education was formed in 2012 from the merger of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

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2012-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Curriculum and Instruction (predecessor)
  • Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (predecessor)

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ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICANS have a long, rich history in the country now known as the United States. From Native Hawaiians—the original inhabitants and rightful stewards of the islands—to more recent voluntary and involuntary immigrants, Asian Pacific Americans have created homes, built communities, and contributed to the diverse storytelling fabric of society. Our creatives tell stories through different media, demanding and creating #OwnVoices narratives that push back against single story stereotypes of perpetual foreigners and slant-eyed caricatures. They push back against the notions that our food is inedible, our language is unintelligible, and our dreams do not matter.

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This article is published as Dahlen, S. P. & Rodríguez, N. N. (2020). Asian Pacific American showcase: Narratives of home and family push back against stereotypes of perpetual foreigners. School Library Journal, 66(5), 39-41. Reproduced, with permission from Library Journal.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2020
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