Married Black men's opinions as to why Black women are disproportionately single: A qualitative study

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2014-03-01
Authors
Hurt, Tera
McElroy, Stacey
Sheats, Kameron
Landor, Antoinette
Bryant, Chalandra
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Jordan (Hurt), Tera
Assistant Provost for Faculty Success
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

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1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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This study's purpose was to explore the reasons Black women are disproportionately single according to the unique viewpoint of married Black men. The sample comprises 52 married Black men who resided in northeast Georgia (mean age = 43). Qualitative interviews were conducted in 2010 as part of the Pathways to Marriage study. The authors analyzed the data in a collaborative fashion and utilized content analyses to explore the relationships in the data, which were derived from qualitative interviews with the men. Findings on the reasons for the disproportionality of singlehood among Black women reflected these four themes: gender relations, marriage education and socialization, individual development, and a preference for gay/lesbian relationships. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

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This accepted article is published as Hurt, T.R., McElroyg, S. E., Sheatsg, K. J., Landorg, A., & Bryant, C. M. (2013). Married Black men’s opinions as to why Black women are disproportionately single: A qualitative study. Personal Relationships, 21 (1), 88-109. doi: 10.1111/pere.12019. Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2014
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