Barkhausen effect in steels and its dependence on surface condition

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1997-04-15
Authors
Parakka, Anthony
Gupta, H.
Zang, M.
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Jiles, David
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

The Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State has been involved in the use of nondestructive evaluation testing (NDT) technologies to: assess the integrity of a substance, material or structure; assess the criticality of any flaws, and to predict the object’s remaining serviceability. NDT technologies used include ultrasonics and acoustic emissions, electromagnetic technologies, computer tomography, thermal imaging, and others.

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In October of 1985 the CNDE was approved by the State Board of Regents after it had received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as an Industry/University Cooperative Research Center.

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Abstract

Micromagnetic Barkhausen signals from magnetic materials originate from the discontinuous changes in magnetization under the action of a changing applied magnetic field.Barkhausen emissions that are detected by a sense coil come predominantly from a surface layer. In iron based materials this layer is about 500 μm thick. The Barkhausen signal is affected by changes in material microstructure and the presence of residual stress, since these affect the dynamics of domain wall motion. The selective attenuation of high frequency components of the Barkhausen signal due to eddy currents in electrically conducting materials is used to evaluate changes in material condition at different depths inside the material.Barkhausen measurements on specimens subjected to different thermal treatment during surface conditioning procedures are presented. Also presented for comparison are analysis of the material condition using x-ray diffraction for assessment of residual stress, and microhardness measurements which evaluate the surface microstructure condition. The results show that Barkhausen emissions can be utilized to evaluate changes in the surface condition of materials.

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The following article appeared in Journal of Applied Physics 81 (1997): 5085 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.364516.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1997
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