Free Energy Calculations of Crystalline Hard Sphere Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

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2015-01-01
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Gunawardana, Koralagamage
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Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

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Abstract

Recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (FMT) is used to study binary hard sphere (HS) complexes in crystalline phases. By comparing the excess free energy, pressure, and phase diagram, we show that the fundamental measure functional yields good agreements to the available simulation results of AB, AB2, and AB13 crystals. Furthermore, we use this functional to study the HS models of five binary crystals, Cu5Zr(C15b), Cu51Zr14(β), Cu10Zr7(ϕ), CuZr(B2), and CuZr2(C11b), which are observed in the Cu–Zr system. The FMT functional gives a well-behaved minimum for most of the hard sphere crystal complexes in the two-dimensional Gaussian parameter space, namely a crystalline phase. However, the current version of FMT functional (White Bear) fails to give a stable minimum for the structure Cu10Zr7(ϕ). We argue that the observed solid phases for the HS models of the Cu–Zr system are true thermodynamic stable phases and can be used as a reference system in perturbation calculations.

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Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Journal of Physical Chemistry B 119 (2015): 9160, doi:10.1021/jp5090907. Copyright 2015 American Chemical Society.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2015
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