Phase-field modeling of fracture in liquid

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2011-08-11
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Idesman, Alexander
Palakala, Ameeth
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Aerospace Engineering

The Department of Aerospace Engineering seeks to instruct the design, analysis, testing, and operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, or space, including studies of aerodynamics, structure mechanics, propulsion, and the like.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering was organized as the Department of Aeronautical Engineering in 1942. Its name was changed to the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1961. In 1990, the department absorbed the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and became the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In 2003 the name was changed back to the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

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1942-present

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  • Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics (1990-2003)

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Phase-field theory for the description of the overdriven fracture in liquid (cavitation) in tensile pressure wave is developed. Various results from solid mechanics are transferred into mechanics of fluids. Thermodynamic potential is formulated that describes the desired tensile pressure–volumetric strain curve and for which the infinitesimal damage produces infinitesimal change in the equilibrium bulk modulus. It is shown that the gradient of the order parameter should not be included in the energy, in contrast to all known phase-field approaches for any material instability. Analytical analysis of the equations is performed. Problems relevant to the melt-dispersion mechanism of the reaction of nanoparticles on cavitation in spherical and ellipsoidal nanoparticles with different aspect ratios, after compressive pressure at its surface sharply dropped, are solved using finite element method. Some nontrivial features (lack of fracture at dynamic pressure much larger than the liquid strength and lack of localized damage for some cases) are obtained analytically and numerically. Equations are formulated for fracture in viscous liquid. A similar approach can be applied to fracture in amorphous and crystalline solids.

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The following article appeared in Journal of Applied Physics 110 (2011): 033531 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3619807.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2011
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