Assessment of the Effects of Scanning Variations and Eddy Current Probe Type on Crack Detection

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1985
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Rummel, Ward
Christner, Brent
Mullen, Steven
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Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation
Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

Begun in 1973, the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation (QNDE) is the premier international NDE meeting designed to provide an interface between research and early engineering through the presentation of current ideas and results focused on facilitating a rapid transfer to engineering development.

This site provides free, public access to papers presented at the annual QNDE conference between 1983 and 1999, and abstracts for papers presented at the conference since 2001.

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Abstract

Eddy current procedures are currently the most capable, of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that are being applied in industry. The performance capability of an NDE procedure is that of the probability of detection as a function of flaw size. Prediction of the performance capability of a given procedure has been inexact, due to the lack of supporting theory, and has therefore been either validated experimentally or has been assumed to be applicable to a test problem by its similarity to a “time proven” application. Rigorous experimental validation of an NDE procedure is laborious and must be repeated for each new application and/or change in NDE parameters. Attention has been focused on this problem and much of the work described in this volume is directed toward the determination of critical characteristics of NDE applications and in the generation of supporting theory to facilitate predictive modeling of NDE performance capability. The experimental work described in this paper expands on previous work on the characterization of eddy current probes, as applied to flaw detection [1,2], and is directed to support the expansion of application theory [3].

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1985