Revisiting the Power Pose Effect: How Robust Are the Results Reported by Carney, Cuddy, and Yap (2010) to Data Analytic Decisions?

dc.contributor.author Credé, Marcus
dc.contributor.author Phillips, Leigh
dc.contributor.author Phillips, L. Alison
dc.contributor.department Psychology
dc.date 2021-04-23T18:56:00.000
dc.date.accessioned 2021-04-30T09:48:25Z
dc.date.available 2021-04-30T09:48:25Z
dc.date.copyright Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017
dc.date.issued 2017-07-01
dc.description.abstract <p>The literature on the impact of expansive poses on biological and psychological variables is characterized by discrepant findings. These discrepant findings may, in part, be a function of differences in how data were analyzed. In this article, we use multiverse analysis to examine whether the findings reported in the original paper by Carney, Cuddy, and Yap are robust to plausible alternative data analytic specifications: outlier identification strategy, the specification of the dependent variable, and the use of control variables. Our findings indicate that the inferences regarding the presence and size of an effect on testosterone and cortisol are highly sensitive to data analytic specifications. We encourage researchers to routinely explore the influence of data analytic choices on statistical inferences and also encourage editors and reviewers to require explicit examinations of the influence of alternative data analytic specifications on the inferences that are drawn from data.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This is a manuscript of an article published as Credé, Marcus, and Leigh A. Phillips. "Revisiting the power pose effect: How robust are the results reported by Carney, Cuddy, and Yap (2010) to data analytic decisions?" <em>Social Psychological and Personality Science</em> 8, no. 5 (2017): 493-499. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1948550617714584" target="_blank">10.1177%2F1948550617714584</a>. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/psychology_pubs/123/
dc.identifier.articleid 1135
dc.identifier.contextkey 22616990
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath psychology_pubs/123
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/105157
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/psychology_pubs/123/2017_PhillipsAlison_RevisitingPower.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 19:18:12 UTC 2022
dc.source.uri 10.1177%2F1948550617714584
dc.subject.disciplines Psychology
dc.subject.disciplines Social Psychology
dc.subject.disciplines Statistical Models
dc.subject.keywords expansive pose
dc.subject.keywords power pose
dc.subject.keywords p-hacking
dc.subject.keywords multiverse analysis
dc.subject.keywords researcher degrees of freedom
dc.title Revisiting the Power Pose Effect: How Robust Are the Results Reported by Carney, Cuddy, and Yap (2010) to Data Analytic Decisions?
dc.type article
dc.type.genre article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication 4e40d37e-5cf8-49a1-aaa3-405c207e6492
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 796236b3-85a0-4cde-b154-31da9e94ed42
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