Autonomy, Manipulation, and Respect (for Mortals)

dc.contributor.author Atchison, Thomas
dc.date 2018-12-09T17:55:36.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-02T06:24:21Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-02T06:24:21Z
dc.date.issued 2013-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>Manipulative communication (communication that “pushes people’s buttons,” works at an unconscious level, and bypasses critical thinking) is often regarded as unethical because it fails to respect rational autonomy. But, if we take seriously the extent to which people are only very imperfectly rational, we may need to rethink this norm and the associated conception of autonomy.</p>
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/sciencecommunication/2013/proceedings/2/
dc.identifier.articleid 1025
dc.identifier.contextkey 12242746
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.31274/sciencecommunication-180809-26
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath sciencecommunication/2013/proceedings/2
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/84450
dc.relation.ispartofseries Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/sciencecommunication/2013/proceedings/2/Atchison.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 22:13:24 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Communication
dc.title Autonomy, Manipulation, and Respect (for Mortals)
dc.type event
dc.type.genre event
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isSeriesOfPublication 1f2f68e9-7cb8-411d-83d3-f446aa53b183
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