Experiences of Persons With Parkinson’s Disease Engaged in Group Therapeutic Singing

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2017-12-30
Authors
Hurt, Tera
Shirley, Margaret
Camp, Randie
Green, Chrishelda
Pattee, Jenna
Williams, Ebony
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Jordan (Hurt), Tera
Assistant Provost for Faculty Success
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Stegemoller, Elizabeth
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Kinesiology
The Department of Kinesiology seeks to provide an ample knowledge of physical activity and active living to students both within and outside of the program; by providing knowledge of the role of movement and physical activity throughout the lifespan, it seeks to improve the lives of all members of the community. Its options for students enrolled in the department include: Athletic Training; Community and Public Health; Exercise Sciences; Pre-Health Professions; and Physical Education Teacher Licensure. The Department of Physical Education was founded in 1974 from the merger of the Department of Physical Education for Men and the Department of Physical Education for Women. In 1981 its name changed to the Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies. In 1993 its name changed to the Department of Health and Human Performance. In 2007 its name changed to the Department of Kinesiology. Dates of Existence: 1974-present. Historical Names: Department of Physical Education (1974-1981), Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies (1981-1993), Department of Health and Human Performance (1993-2007). Related Units: College of Human Sciences (parent college), College of Education (parent college, 1974 - 2005), Department of Physical Education for Women (predecessor) Department of Physical Education for Men
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

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The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

Related Units

  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Abstract

Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to altered neural control of movement, including the control of voice, respiration, and swallowing. There is a prevalent need to provide therapy for voice, respiration, and swallowing difficulties because current pharmacological and surgical treatments do not effectively treat these impairments. Previous research has demonstrated that singing may be a treatment option to target voice, respiratory, and swallowing impairments, as well as quality of life. However, participants’ perspectives related to reasons for enrolling and engaging in programs as well as evaluation of singing programs have been neglected.

Objective The purpose of this descriptive study was thus to solicit participants’ views of their involvement in a group singing intervention (GSI) led by credentialed music therapists.

Methods Twenty persons with PD were interviewed 4 to 6 months after completing the singing intervention. Participants were asked about 1) why they chose to participate, 2) what were the beneficial and non-beneficial aspects of participating, and 3) how to improve overall design and delivery of the GSI.

Results Using content analysis procedures, we learned that participants regarded their involvement in the study as mutually beneficial, fun, and engaging. Participants appreciated the fellowship with other persons with PD and offered minimal constructive criticism.

Conclusions This study provided greater insight into how a therapeutic singing program may benefit participants and positively impact their lives.

Comments

This accepted article is published as Elizabeth L Stegemöller, PhD, MT-BC Tera R Hurt, PhD Margaret C O’Connor, BS Randie D Camp, MS Chrishelda W Green, BS Jenna C Pattee, BS Ebony K Williams, MS; Experiences of Persons With Parkinson’s Disease Engaged in Group Therapeutic Singing. Journal of Music Therapy, Volume 54, Issue 4, 30 December 2017, Pages 405–431, DOI: 10.1093/jmt/thx012. Posted with permission.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017
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