Occurrence of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in cropland and adjacent areas

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2000-06-01
Authors
Hartzler, Robert
Buhler, Douglas
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

Dates of Existence
1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Iowa Monarch Conservation Consortium
The Iowa Monarch Conservation Consortium is a community-led organization whose mission is to enhance monarch butterfly reproduction and survival in Iowa through collaborative and coordinated efforts of farmers, private citizens and their organizations.
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Abstract

Interest in the population dynamics and geographic distribution of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) has recently increased due to the importance of common milkweed in the life cycle of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). A survey of common milkweed occurrence in various habitats was conducted in Iowa in June and July of 1999. Common milkweed was found in 71% of the roadsides and approximately 50% of the corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) fields. Corn and soybean fields had 85% fewer patches than roadsides. Conservation reserve program fields had the greatest average area infested. While common milkweed was frequently found in corn and soybean fields, average frequency and patch sizes were much greater in noncrop areas.

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This article is from Crop Protection 19 (2000): 363, doi:10.1016/S0261-2194(00)00024-7. Posted with permission.

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