Computational simulation of separated flow in a three-dimensional diffuser using v2-f and zeta-f models

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2008-01-01
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Ryon, Jason
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Paul A. Durbin
Tom I-P Shih
Hui Hu
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Aerospace Engineering

The Department of Aerospace Engineering seeks to instruct the design, analysis, testing, and operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, or space, including studies of aerodynamics, structure mechanics, propulsion, and the like.

History
The Department of Aerospace Engineering was organized as the Department of Aeronautical Engineering in 1942. Its name was changed to the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1961. In 1990, the department absorbed the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and became the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In 2003 the name was changed back to the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

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1942-present

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  • Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics (1990-2003)

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Computational prediction of separated flows is an area of interest, specifically in applications to gas turbine engines, liquid pumps, and many other engineering applications. Although these types of flows are governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of practical engineering flows is currently too expensive in terms of the required computational time. It is therefore a case to attempt simulation of these flows using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations which must be closed by utilizing a turbulence closure model.;The present study used the NASA Glenn-HT code, a compressible Navier-Stokes solver, with two different turbulence models, the u2 --f model of Durbin and the zeta-- f model of Hanjalic, to observe their abilities to predict separated flows. The elliptic relaxation turbulence models and their implementation in Glenn-HT are described. Three cases are described to show the ability and limitations of these turbulence models.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2008