IRE1, a component of the unfolded protein response signaling pathway, protects pollen development in Arabidopsis from heat stress

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2016-10-01
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Deng, Yan
Srivastava, Renu
Quilichini, Teagen
Dong, Haili
Bao, Yan
Howell, Stephen
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Horner, Harry
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Computer Science

Computer Science—the theory, representation, processing, communication and use of information—is fundamentally transforming every aspect of human endeavor. The Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University advances computational and information sciences through; 1. educational and research programs within and beyond the university; 2. active engagement to help define national and international research, and 3. educational agendas, and sustained commitment to graduating leaders for academia, industry and government.

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The Computer Science Department was officially established in 1969, with Robert Stewart serving as the founding Department Chair. Faculty were composed of joint appointments with Mathematics, Statistics, and Electrical Engineering. In 1969, the building which now houses the Computer Science department, then simply called the Computer Science building, was completed. Later it was named Atanasoff Hall. Throughout the 1980s to present, the department expanded and developed its teaching and research agendas to cover many areas of computing.

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Plant Pathology and Microbiology
The Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology and the Department of Entomology officially merged as of September 1, 2022. The new department is known as the Department of Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Microbiology (PPEM). The overall mission of the Department is to benefit society through research, teaching, and extension activities that improve pest management and prevent disease. Collectively, the Department consists of about 100 faculty, staff, and students who are engaged in research, teaching, and extension activities that are central to the mission of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Department possesses state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities in the Advanced Research and Teaching Building and in Science II. In addition, research and extension activities are performed off-campus at the Field Extension Education Laboratory, the Horticulture Station, the Agriculture Engineering/Agronomy Farm, and several Research and Demonstration Farms located around the state. Furthermore, the Department houses the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic, the Iowa Soybean Research Center, the Insect Zoo, and BugGuide. Several USDA-ARS scientists are also affiliated with the Department.
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The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated by various stresses during vegetative development in Arabidopsis, but is constitutively active in anthers of unstressed plants. To understand the role of the UPR during reproductive development, we analyzed a double mutant, ire1a ire1b. The double mutant knocks out the RNA splicing arm of the UPR signaling pathway and is fertile at room temperature, but is male sterile at modestly elevated temperature (ET). The conditional male sterility in the mutant is a sporophytic trait, and when the double mutant was grown at ET, defects appeared in the structure of the tapetum. As a result, the tapetum in the double mutant failed to properly deposit the pollen coat at ET, which made pollen grains clump and prevented their normal dispersal. IRE1 is a dual protein kinase/ribonuclease involved in the splicing of bZIP60 mRNA, and through complementation analysis of various mutant forms of IRE1b, it was demonstrated that the ribonuclease activity of IRE1 was required for protecting male fertility from ET. It was also found that overexpression of SEC31A rescued the conditional male sterility in the double mutant. SEC31A is involved in ER to Golgi trafficking and a major target of the IRE1-mediated UPR signaling in stressed seedlings. Thus, IRE1, a major component of the UPR, plays an important role in protecting pollen development from ET.

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This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Deng, Yan, Renu Srivastava, Teagen D. Quilichini, Haili Dong, Yan Bao, Harry T. Horner, and Stephen H. Howell. "IRE 1, a component of the unfolded protein response signaling pathway, protects pollen development in Arabidopsis from heat stress." The Plant Journal 88, no. 2 (2016): 193-204, which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1111/tpj.13239. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2016
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