Comparison of two commercial ovine Campylobacter vaccines and an experimental bacterin in guinea pigs inoculated with Campylobacter jejuni

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Date
2011-06-01
Authors
Plummer, Paul
Burrough, Eric
Sahin, Orhan
Zhang, Qijing
Plummer, Paul
DiVerde, Kevin
Zhang, Qijing
Yaeger, Michael
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Veterinary PathologyVeterinary Microbiology and Preventive MedicineVeterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine
Abstract

Objective—To compare efficacy of 2 commercial ovine Campylobacter vaccines and an experimental bacterin in guinea pigs following IP inoculation with Campylobacter jejuni IA3902.

Animals—51 female guinea pigs.

Procedures—Pregnant and nonpregnant animals were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups and administered a commercial Campylobacter vaccine labeled for prevention of campylobacteriosis in sheep via two 5-mL doses 14 days apart (vaccine A; n = 13), another labeled for prevention of campylobacteriosis via two 2-mL doses (vaccine B; 12), an experimental bacterin prepared from the challenge strain (12), or a sham vaccine (14). Ten days later, animals were challenged IP with C jejuni IA3902; 48 hours later, animals were euthanized, complete necropsy was performed, and blood and tissue samples were obtained for bacteriologic culture.

Results—Administration of vaccine B or the experimental bacterin, but not vaccine A, significantly reduced 48-hour infection rates versus administration of the sham vaccine. A significantly reduced 48-hour infection rate was associated with administration of vaccine B independent of pregnancy status.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of vaccine B significantly reduced infection in guinea pigs challenged with C jejuni IA3902, similar to a homologous bacterin. Results suggested that vaccine B or an autogenous product may be effective in controlling ovine campylobacteriosis caused by this emergent abortifacient strain. Bacteriologic culture of blood, liver, bile, and uterus in nonpregnant guinea pigs 48 hours after inoculation may be a useful screening tool for comparing efficacy of C jejuni vaccines.

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This article is published as Burrough, Eric R., Orhan Sahin, Paul J. Plummer, Kevin D. DiVerde, Qijing Zhang, and Michael J. Yaeger. "Comparison of two commercial ovine Campylobacter vaccines and an experimental bacterin in guinea pigs inoculated with Campylobacter jejuni." American journal of veterinary research 72, no. 6 (2011): 799-805. doi: https://doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.72.6.799. Posted with permission.

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