Pathogenomics of Culex quinquefasciatus and meta-analysis of infection responses to diverse pathogens

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2010-01-01
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Bartholomay, Lyric
Waterhouse, Robert
Mayhew, George
Campbell, Corey
Michel, Kristin
Zou, Zhen
Ramirez, Jose
Das, Suchismita
Alvarez, Kanwal
Arensburger, Peter
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Entomology

The Department of Entomology seeks to teach the study of insects, their life-cycles, and the practicalities in dealing with them, for use in the fields of business, industry, education, and public health. The study of entomology can be applied towards evolution and ecological sciences, and insects’ relationships with other organisms & humans, or towards an agricultural or horticultural focus, focusing more on pest-control and management.

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The Department of Entomology was founded in 1975 as a result of the division of the Department of Zoology and Entomology.

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Abstract

The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus poses a significant threat to human and veterinary health as a primary vector of West Nile virus (WNV), the filarial worm Wuchereria bancrofti, and an avian malaria parasite. Comparative phylogenomics revealed an expanded canonical C. quinquefasciatus immune gene repertoire compared with those of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. Transcriptomic analysis of C. quinquefasciatus genes responsive to WNV, W. bancrofti and non-native bacteria facilitated an unprecedented meta-analysis of 25 vector-pathogen interactions involving arboviruses, filarial worms, bacteria and malaria parasites, revealing common and distinct responses to these pathogen types in three mosquito genera. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that mosquito-borne pathogens have evolved to evade innate immune responses in three vector mosquito species of major medical importance.

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This is an author's manuscript of an article from Science 330 (2010): 88, doi:10.1126/science.1193162. Posted with permission.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2010
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