Measured and calculated variables of global oxygenation in healthy neonatal foals

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2017-02-01
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Wong, David
Hepworth-Warren, Kate
Sponseller, Beatrice
Howard, Joan
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Veterinary Clinical Sciences
The mission of the Veterinary Clinical Sciences Department and the Veterinary Medical Center is to be strong academically, to provide outstanding services, and to conduct research in the multiple areas of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Our goals are to teach students in the multiple disciplines of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, to provide excellent veterinary services to clients, and to generate and disseminate new knowledge in the areas of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Our objectives are to provide a curriculum in the various aspects of Veterinary Clinical Sciences which ensures students acquire the skills and knowledge to be successful in their chosen careers. We also strive to maintain a caseload of sufficient size and diversity which insures a broad clinical experience for students, residents, and faculty. In addition, we aim to provide clinical veterinary services of the highest standards to animal owners and to referring veterinarians. And finally, we strive to provide an environment and opportunities which foster and encourage the generation and dissemination of new knowledge in many of the disciplines of Veterinary Clinical Sciences.
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Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine
The mission of VDPAM is to educate current and future food animal veterinarians, population medicine scientists and stakeholders by increasing our understanding of issues that impact the health, productivity and well-being of food and fiber producing animals; developing innovative solutions for animal health and food safety; and providing the highest quality, most comprehensive clinical practice and diagnostic services. Our department is made up of highly trained specialists who span a wide range of veterinary disciplines and species interests. We have faculty of all ranks with expertise in diagnostics, medicine, surgery, pathology, microbiology, epidemiology, public health, and production medicine. Most have earned certification from specialty boards. Dozens of additional scientists and laboratory technicians support the research and service components of our department.
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess multiple central venous and arterial blood variables that alone o r in conjunction with one another reflect global oxygenation status in healthy neonatal foals.

ANIMALS 11 healthy neonatal foals.

PROCEDURES Central venous and arterial blood samples were collected from healthy neonatal foals at 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours after birth. Variables measured from central venous and arterial blood samples included oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, partial pressure of oxygen, lactate concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and pH. Calculated variables included venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide gap, estimated oxygen ext raction ratio, ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to the fraction of inspired oxygen, bicarbonate concentration, base excess, and blood oxygen content.

RESULTS Significant differences between arterial and central venous blood obtained from neonatal foals were detected for several variables, particularly partial pressure of oxygen, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and oxygen content. In addition, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in central venous blood samples was significantly higher than the value for cor responding arterial blood samples. Several temporal differences were detected for other variables.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study provided info rmation about several variables that reflect global oxygenation in healthy neonatal foals. Values for these variables in healthy foals can allow for comparison with values for critically ill foals in future studies. Comparison of these variables between healthy and ill foals may aid in treatment decisions and prognosis of clinical outcome for crit ically ill foals.

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This article is published as Wong, David M., Kate L. Hepworth-Warren, Beatrice T. Sponseller, Joan M. Howard, and Chong Wang. "Measured and calculated variables of global oxygenation in healthy neonatal foals." American journal of veterinary research 78, no. 2 (2017): 230-238. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.78.2.230. Posted with permission.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2017
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