Population Genetics of Increased Hybrid Performance between Two Maize Populations under Reciprocal Recurrent Selection

Date
1999
Authors
Labate, J. A.
Lamkey, K. R.
Lamkey, Kendall
Lee, M.
Woodman, W. L.
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Agronomy
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Agronomy
Abstract

Heterosis, the superiority in one or more characteristics of crossbred organisms relative to their inbred parents, is the basis of the modern cultivars utilized in maize (Zed mays L.). Heterosis is of interest in nondomesticated species due to its relevance to the question "how much polymorphism is maintained in natural populations due to selection?" (Berger, 1976). For maize and certain other domesticated species that employ inbred lines to produce commercial hybrids, knowledge of the mechanisms of gene action producing heterosis could contribute to advances in breeding techniques.

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This proceeding was published as Labate, J. A., K. R. Lamkey, M. Lee, and W. L. Woodman. 1999. Population genetics of increased hybrid performance between two maize populations under reciprocal recurrent selection. p. 127-137. In: J.G. Coors and S. Pandey (ed.) Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Genetics and Exploitation of Heterosis in Crops, CIMMYT, Mexico City, Mexico, 17-22 Aug. 1997.

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