Hybrid Processing

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2019-05-06
Authors
Wen, Zhiyou
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Jarboe, Laura
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Center for Crops Utilization Research
In the 1980s a crisis existed in American farming—a crisis of overproduction, underutilization, and decreasing international market share for raw commodities. Also, the United States’ growing dependence on imported oil and long-term forecasts for increasing oil prices put America at risk. To address this crisis, Center for Crops Utilization Research (CCUR) was established in 1984 through a special appropriation from the Iowa legislature. The center was tasked to respond to the urgent need to improve America’s agricultural competitiveness. Four decades later, there are new opportunities to increase demand for Iowa’s crops. Consumer demand is increasing for new healthful food ingredients, biobased alternatives to petroleum-based products, and sustainable and environmentally friendly industrial processes. The rapid advancement of new food processing technologies and industrial biotechnology enable those demands to be met in an economically viable way. While CCUR’s core mission of increasing demand for Iowa crops remains relevant, the center is also taking these opportunities to grow our connection with companies and entrepreneurs to help them to test, troubleshoot, and optimize their ideas in an industrial-friendly setting.
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Chemical and Biological Engineering

The function of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been to prepare students for the study and application of chemistry in industry. This focus has included preparation for employment in various industries as well as the development, design, and operation of equipment and processes within industry.Through the CBE Department, Iowa State University is nationally recognized for its initiatives in bioinformatics, biomaterials, bioproducts, metabolic/tissue engineering, multiphase computational fluid dynamics, advanced polymeric materials and nanostructured materials.

History
The Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1913 under the Department of Physics and Illuminating Engineering. From 1915 to 1931 it was jointly administered by the Divisions of Industrial Science and Engineering, and from 1931 onward it has been under the Division/College of Engineering. In 1928 it merged with Mining Engineering, and from 1973–1979 it merged with Nuclear Engineering. It became Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2005.

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1913 - present

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  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1913–1928)
  • Department of Chemical and Mining Engineering (1928–1957)
  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1957–1973, 1979–2005)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (2005–present)

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Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
The Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB) Program at Iowa State University is an interdepartmental graduate major offering outstanding opportunities for graduate study toward the Ph.D. degree in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. The BCB program involves more than 80 nationally and internationally known faculty—biologists, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and physicists—who participate in a wide range of collaborative projects.
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Abstract

Human societies have converted biomass into energy and products for millennia using both biochemical and thermochemical processes. Familiar examples of biochemical processing includes fermentation of sugar- or starch-rich crops and milk into sauerkraut, beer, wine, yogurt, and cheese. Familiar examples of thermochemical processing include baking and cooking of food and burning wood for heat and power.

Comments

This is a manuscript of a chapter published as Wen, Zhiyou and Laura R. Jarboe, “Hybrid Processing.” In Thermochemical Processing of Biomass: Conversion into Fuels, Chemicals and Power, Second Edition (Robert C. Brown, ed.). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2019, pages 306-336. DOI: 10.1002/9781119417637.ch9. Posted with permission.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2019
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