Isothermal Airflow Characteristics in the Animal-occupied Zone of a Slot-ventilated Swine Facility

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1995
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Hoff, Steven
Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Airspeed and turbulence measurements were collected in a full-scale swine grower facility. Data were collected in three horizontal planes at eight axial locations from the inlet sidewall. Three inlet slot heights (20, 40, and 60 mm) and two fan stages resulted in six ventilating conditions investigated. The resulting 2 ¥ 3 ¥ 8 factorial experiment showed that fan stage, inlet height, and axial position from the inlet significantly affected (p < 0.01) airspeed variations in the animal-occupied zone (AOZ). Correlations between the AOZ and a convenient measuring plane (MP) were sought. AOZ airspeed was highly correlated with MP airspeed (rxy = 0.91). AOZ turbulent intensity (rxy = –0.51) and turbulent kinetic energy (rxy = 0.75) were moderately correlated with MP airspeed. AOZ turbulence levels were not correlated with MP turbulence levels. A procedure, consistent with the system characteristic technique, is proposed for predicting axial variations in AOZ airspeed. The technique can be used to assess AOZ airspeed levels relative to penning layout and ventilating conditions.

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This article is from Transactions of the ASAE 38, no. 6 (1995): 1843–1852.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1995
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