Thermodynamics of Symmetric Diblock Copolymers Containing Poly(styrene-ran-styrenesulfonic acid)

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2012-12-26
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Hernández, Nacú
Benson, Calvin
Cochran, Eric
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Cochran, Eric
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Chemical and Biological Engineering

The function of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been to prepare students for the study and application of chemistry in industry. This focus has included preparation for employment in various industries as well as the development, design, and operation of equipment and processes within industry.Through the CBE Department, Iowa State University is nationally recognized for its initiatives in bioinformatics, biomaterials, bioproducts, metabolic/tissue engineering, multiphase computational fluid dynamics, advanced polymeric materials and nanostructured materials.

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The Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1913 under the Department of Physics and Illuminating Engineering. From 1915 to 1931 it was jointly administered by the Divisions of Industrial Science and Engineering, and from 1931 onward it has been under the Division/College of Engineering. In 1928 it merged with Mining Engineering, and from 1973–1979 it merged with Nuclear Engineering. It became Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2005.

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1913 - present

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  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1913–1928)
  • Department of Chemical and Mining Engineering (1928–1957)
  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1957–1973, 1979–2005)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (2005–present)

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Abstract

We examine the thermodynamic behavior of diblock copolymers representing the binary pairs of the ternary system: poly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(ethylene-stat-propylene)/poly(styrene-ran-styrenesulfonic acid), D/EP/SS. We employ small-angle X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and rheology to characterize the order-to-disorder transition temperature TODTand lamellar period d of 28 materials with varying molecular weights and sulfonation extents. These data are then interpreted in the context of self-consistent mean-field theory employing the continuous Gaussian chain model to deduce the interaction parameters as a function of temperature and sulfonation extent. We find that while EPD and SSEP are amenable to such treatment, the SS/D interaction forces SSD chains to stretch beyond the realm of applicability of the Gaussian chain model.

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Reprinted with permission from Macromolecules 46 (2013): 179–187, doi:10.1021/ma301228v. Copyright 2012 American Chemical Society.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012
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