Enhancing Corn Yield in a Winter Cereal Rye Cover Cropping System

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2016-01-01
Authors
Patel, Swetabh
Lundvall, John
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Sawyer, John
Emeritus Professor
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Extension and Experiment Station Publications
It can be very challenging to locate information about individual ISU Extension publications via the library website. Quick Search will list the name of the series, but it will not list individual publications within each series. The Parks Library Reference Collection has a List of Current Series, Serial Publications (Series Publications of Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service), published as of March 2004. It lists each publication from 1888-2004 (by title and publication number - and in some cases it will show an author name).
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

Water quality impairment related to nitrogen (N) is a concern in Iowa, including meeting nitrate (NO3) drinking water standards and reducing the amount of N lost to the Gulf of Mexico. The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy science assessment identified a rye cover crop as an important in-field management practice for reducing N and phosphorus (P) loss from fields (31% NO3-N and 29% P), and for reducing soil erosion. However, the science assessment identified a corn yield reduction of 6 percent when grown following a rye cover crop. Lower corn yield with use of a cover crop is unacceptable to farmers, so it is important to identify practices that minimize impact on corn establishment, early-season growth, and yield. The objective of this project was to study production practices that might enhance corn yield when grown in a winter cereal rye cover cropping system.

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