Water Transport by Thin Moist Layers in Project STORM Soundings

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2001-01-01
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Seidel, James
Ervin, Andrew
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Gutowski, William
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Geological and Atmospheric Sciences

The Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences offers majors in three areas: Geology (traditional, environmental, or hydrogeology, for work as a surveyor or in mineral exploration), Meteorology (studies in global atmosphere, weather technology, and modeling for work as a meteorologist), and Earth Sciences (interdisciplinary mixture of geology, meteorology, and other natural sciences, with option of teacher-licensure).

History
The Department of Geology and Mining was founded in 1898. In 1902 its name changed to the Department of Geology. In 1965 its name changed to the Department of Earth Science. In 1977 its name changed to the Department of Earth Sciences. In 1989 its name changed to the Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences.

Dates of Existence
1898-present

Historical Names

  • Department of Geology and Mining (1898-1902)
  • Department of Geology (1902-1965)
  • Department of Earth Science (1965-1977)
  • Department of Earth Sciences (1977-1989)

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A previous examination of water vapor layers in Project STORM-FEST is extended to include Project STORM-WAVE rawinsonde observations and assess the contribution of layers in these two datasets to atmospheric water transport. The observations indicate that the contribution of these layers to water transport climatology is only a few percent. However the analysis also shows that episodes occur fairly frequently where these layers contribute 20% or more of the horizontal transport. Instances when the layer’s moisture is an important part of the water transport tend to occur for relatively dry soundings. Numerical models that fail to resolve the layers during these episodes may thus miss condensation events leading to cloud formation and precipitation, and also give overly smooth vertical profiles of radiative heating and cooling. The layers thus appear to be important for numerical weather prediction.

Comments

This article is from Mon. Wea. Rev., 129, 167–172. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0493(2001)129<0167:WTBTML>2.0.CO;2. Posted with permission.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2001
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