Statistical Confirmation of Empirical Observations Concerning Tool Mark Striae

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2007-07-01
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Faden, D.
Kidd, J.
Craft, J.
Morris, Max
Kreiser, J.
Davis, S.
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Genalo, Lawrence
University Professor Emeritus
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Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

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Statistics
As leaders in statistical research, collaboration, and education, the Department of Statistics at Iowa State University offers students an education like no other. We are committed to our mission of developing and applying statistical methods, and proud of our award-winning students and faculty.
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Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering teaches the composition, microstructure, and processing of materials as well as their properties, uses, and performance. These fields of research utilize technologies in metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and electronic materials.

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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering was formed in 1975 from the merger of the Department of Ceramics Engineering and the Department of Metallurgical Engineering.

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1975-present

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Toolmarks produced by 44 sequentially manufactured screwdriver tips have been characterized for surface roughness using a profilometer. Toolmarks were produced in lead at angles of 30°, 60°, and 85°. A computer program developed to compare and match the profilometer data has been used to show that marks from a single tip produced at similar angles yield much higher correlation values than marks produced from the same tip but at different angles. This analysis provides statistical support for the widely-accepted empirical observation that toolmark striae must be reproduced at similar angles in order to be unambiguously identified as being made by a particular tool.

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This article is from AFTE Journal 39 (2007): 205. Posted with permission.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007
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