Climate change impacts on mycotoxin risks in US maize

Thumbnail Image
Date
2011-02-01
Authors
Wu, F.
Bhatnagar, D.
Bui-Klimke, T.
Carbone, I.
Paul, P.
Payne, G.
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Munkvold, Gary
Professor
Person
Takle, Eugene
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Person
Hellmich, Richard
Emeritus USDA-ARS Research Entomologist Emeritus Affiliate Professor
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Entomology

The Department of Entomology seeks to teach the study of insects, their life-cycles, and the practicalities in dealing with them, for use in the fields of business, industry, education, and public health. The study of entomology can be applied towards evolution and ecological sciences, and insects’ relationships with other organisms & humans, or towards an agricultural or horticultural focus, focusing more on pest-control and management.

History
The Department of Entomology was founded in 1975 as a result of the division of the Department of Zoology and Entomology.

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

To ensure future food security, it is crucial to understand how potential climate change scenarios will affect agriculture. One key area of interest is how climatic factors, both in the near- and the long-term future, could affect fungal infection of crops and mycotoxin production by these fungi. The objective of this paper is to review the potential impact of climate change on three important mycotoxins that contaminate maize in the United States, and to highlight key research questions and approaches for understanding this impact. Recent climate change analyses that pertain to agriculture and in particular to mycotoxigenic fungi are discussed, with respect to the climatic factors – temperature and relative humidity – at which they thrive and cause severe damage. Additionally, we discuss how climate change will likely alter the life cycles and geographic distribution of insects that are known to facilitate fungal infection of crops.

Comments

This article is from World Mycotoxin Journal; 4 (2011); 79-93; doi: 10.3920/WMJ2010.1246

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Copyright
Collections